Tag Archives: Socrates

Strength and Honor

75 Ways To Become A Better Man

On Becoming a Better Man in the New Year

I hope this inspires you to make your own list

Team Strength and Honor

As we approach the new year it’s time to start reflecting on the previous year and make plans for the next year. I think making new years resolutions is B.S. as most of the resolutions are forgotten by February. Instead of wasting all that time and energy of those B.S. resolution why not try making a list of areas you would like to improve on and focus on one per day. Small and incremental changes lead to long term gain.

1.Give to people without expectations

2. Be on time

3. Stand up for and protect the people you care most about

4. Set boundaries in relationships

5. Find mentors who will help you

6. Directly deal with problems

7. Be a gentleman to her

8. Take a moment and pray or meditate

9. Don’t talk behind anyone’s back

10. Stop making excuses

11. Give your best

12. Join a men’s group (a fraternity, a bible study, a service organization)

13. Don’t let anyone treat you disrespectfully

14. Workout daily

15. Be transparent and authentic

16. Only settle for the best

17. Go fishing with your dad

18. Become a Big Brother

19. Be true to how you feel

20. Go on a camping trip alone

21. Let go of your act and be your true self

22. Eat healthy

23. Take up a new hobby

24. Recognize you need help from others

25. Be at peace with yourself

26. Go get coffee with someone you respect

27. Ask a girl on a real date

28. Run a 5k

29. Give yourself a pat on the back

30. Get a massage

31. Laugh often

32. Write down affirmations and speak them over yourself…“I’m a powerful man”

33. Go to a therapist or support group

34. Go on a retreat

35. Write in a journal

36. Learn to say “no”

37. Take one step towards your dream

38. Have expectations for yourself

39. Let go and surrender

40. Face your fears and take more risks

41. Be present (put your phone away)

42. Let your defenses down

43. Dwell on good things

44. Vacation more

45. Take a class and learn something new

46. Give your best

47. Speak up for yourself

48. Set goals

49. Stop and listen

50. Be thankful

51. Floss everyday

52. Get enough sleep

53. Reach out to family and friends

54. Be generous

55. Be self-aware

56. Watch less TV

57. Reconnect with an old friend

58. Build something with your hands

59. Go outside your comfort zone

60. Let people in

61. Laugh at yourself

62. Release any sense of entitlement

63. Believe God loves you just as you are

64. Be vulnerable with someone

65. Don’t be lukewarm

66. Stop overcommitment

67. Be spontaneous and go on a road trip with friends

68. Forgive someone you’ve held something against

69. Invest in community

70. Read a book

71. Brainstorm more

72. Celebrate and honor others

73. Take a break from social media

74. Accept people as they are

75. Make your needs a priority

7 Lessons from Socrates on Wisdon, Wealth, and the Good Life

 

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What is the Good Life? What is the meaning of Strength and Honor to you?

 

 

What is the Good Life ?

Our character is molded by the choices we made each and everyday.  I’ve found that these 7 lessons from Socrates help me bridge the gap between the person I am and the person I strive to become.

 

1.  “Those who are already wise no longer love wisdom – whether they are gods or men. Similarly, those whose own ignorance has made them bad, rotten, evil, do not strive for wisdom either. For no evil or ignorant person ever strives for wisdom. What remains are those who suffer from ignorance, but still retain some sense and understanding. They are conscious of knowing what they don’t know.” Here, Socrates notes that many of us are aware of our intellectual limitations, even while we’re striving to acquire wisdom.

2. “Well I am certainly wiser than this man. It is only too likely that neither of us has any knowledge to boast of; but he thinks that he knows something which he does not know, whereas I am quite conscious of my ignorance. At any rate it seems that I am wiser than he is to this small extent, that I do not think that I know what I do not know.” Socrates is famous for knowing the limits of his knowledge.

3. “Oh my friend, why do you, who are a citizen of the great and mighty and wise city of Athens, care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor and reputation, and so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul, which you never regard or heed at all? Are you not ashamed of this?” This is a simple plea by Socrates for all us to have more balance in out lives.

4. “For I go about doing nothing else than urging you, young and old, not to care for your persons or your property more than for the perfection of your souls, or even so much; and I tell you that virtue does not come from money, but from virtue comes money and all other good things to man, both the individual and to the state.” I love this particular quote, though it’s not easy to decipher. He appears to be saying that all of us don’t spend enough time striving for moral perfection. If we did, then good things would result.

5. “Fellow citizens, why do you turn and scrape every stone to gather wealth, and, yet, take so little care of your own children, to whom one day you must relinquish all.” This quote is particularly helpful to those of us who are parents.

6. “In truth, the fear of death is nothing but thinking you’re wise when you are not, for you think you know what you don’t. For no one knows whether death happens to be the greatest of all goods for humanity, but people fear it because they’re completely convinced it is the greatest of evils. And isn’t this ignorance, after all, the most shameful kind: thinking you know what you don’t.”

7. “At the time, I made it clear once again, not by talk but by action, that I didn’t care at all about death – if I’m not being too blunt to say it – but it mattered everything that I do nothing unjust or impious, which matters very much to me. For though it had plenty of power, that government didn’t frighten me into doing anything that’s wrong.” 

 

We all need to stand for something in life, and sometimes we’ll need to pay a price for our beliefs. What price are you willing to pay?

Live with Strength and Honor.