Tag Archives: Men

Strength and Honor

10 Ways To Become a Better Man

10 Ways To Become a Better Man in 2016

Evolve and Dominate –

“Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats.”
– HL Mencken

How will you start the new year? Let’s face it, most of us will do the same shit this year as we did last year. Of course, same doesn’t always mean bad. If what you are doing is working than why would you change it. But same doesn’t mean good either. So, if you feel like there are parts of your life that you haven’t figured out yet, you’re not alone. I want to start off by saying this isn’t about B.S. resolutions that you’ll drop halfway into February. I’m talking about real life changing habits that can be reinforced day by day.

Remember, self-improvement does not have to coincide with a calendar or a clock.

It’s about progression and practice. It’s about maturity and growth. It’s a quest to build a strong body and a great life – the kind you can be proud of. So, Let’s get to it!

Do something in each category, each day, for 30 days and you will be totally surprised.

1. Constantly improve yourself
This is the single biggest step you can take to achieving the body and the life that you have always wanted. Make a list of the major areas in your life that you want to improve on and take action. Just do something small each day and you will be surprised by your progress. For example, if you want to be stronger but you can’t get to the gym try doing push ups in the morning and again in the evening.

2.  Stop projecting your weakness onto others

All of us have projected our own thoughts, feelings, motivations and desires onto others, and have been at the other end of projection. Many of us learned to project onto others as we were growing up, when our parents, siblings or caregivers projected their unconscious feelings, thoughts and motivations onto us.

3.  Replace bad habits with good habits

All of the habits that you have right now — good or bad — are in your life for a reason. In some way, these behaviors provide a benefit to you, even if they are bad for you in other ways. A few ways to break a bad habit are to choose a substitute for your bad habit, cut out as many triggers as possible, join forces with somebody, and surround yourself with people who live the way you want to live.

4.  Learn to take the lead

Do not wait for a crisis to emerge to make a decision. Inventory your values and goals, and set a plan for how you will react when certain crises arise and important decisions need to be made. DO NOT wait to make you choice until the heat of the moment, when you will be most tempted to surrender your values. Set a course for yourself, and when trials come, and you are sorely tested, you will not panic, you will not waver, you will simply remember your plan and follow it through.

5. Become an expert in a thing that you enjoy

If there’s something you like to do — playing basketball, cooking, watching history documentaries, drinking beer, whatever — becoming an expert in it will make it even more fun and fulfilling. For me, it’s Aikido and green tea. I’d recommend listing 2-3 things that you really like to do. Then pick on or two and figure out can learn more about it, become better at it, or both. Read articles, watch free videos, buy a book, or find someone who’s really good and knowledgeable at it.

6. Spend more time alone in nature

Every organism has an ideal habitat; take it out of its habitat and it could die, or at least suffer ill-effects. Take a freshwater fish and stick it in a saltwater tank, and soon the fish will be floating belly up. Time spent outdoors is linked to lower levels of obesity. Nature keeps you mentally sharp. Nature promotes calmness and fights depression – need I say more?

7. Stop comparing yourself to others

It is natural to compare yourself to others, and even envy them. But when you become obsessed with your deficiencies, rather than the areas in which you excel, you are focused on the wrong thing. This can be debilitating and it can even prevent you from taking part in many aspects of your life. The first step is changing how you view yourself to to become aware of it.

8. Be on FUCKING TIME

No need to explain this one. Either you get it or you don’t.

9. Give your best

Don’t be afraid to give your best to what seemingly are small jobs. Every time you conquer one it makes you that much stronger. If you do the little jobs well, the big ones will tend to take care of themselves.

10. Embrace the grind

The grind, its what separates the winners from the losers. It’s what gets your hand raised at the end of a long fought battle. It’s what lets you know what you are doing to win. The grind beats you up… wears you out, knocks you down and whispers in your ear “you’re not good enough”. “Is that all you’ve got”, The grind picks you up and pulls you forward. When the time comes to reach down through pain and weakness, the last reserve of strength you have left, the grinds got your back. the grind can not be tamed, it cannot be put off for tomorrow,The grind pushes you through your feet and lifts you to victory , you should not fear the grind but respect it, don’t avoid the grind embrace it.

Oh, and use beard oil.

Strength and Honor

Why Every Man Needs a Challenge

Bellows_George_Dempsey_and_Firpo_1924

“Dempsey and Firpo” by George Bellows, 1924. This painting hangs above my desk.

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from author and Navy SEAL Eric Greitens.

My boxing coach Earl used to say, “You can’t get better fighting someone who’s worse than you.” That was cold comfort after my training partner, Derrick, had cracked me in the mouth with a jab. But I knew that Earl was right. Training with someone who was better than me made me better.

In 1950, the Associated Press polled the leading sports editors in America to find out what they considered the greatest sports moment in the first half of the twentieth century. It was from the fight in the painting above — that very moment — that they selected over all others.

Though largely forgotten today, the punch in that painting was thrown in 1923, in an era when boxing was the dominant sport of the day. A crowd of 80,000 had come to New York’s Polo Grounds to witness the contest for the Heavyweight Championship of the world.

See the man falling through the ropes? That’s Jack Dempsey. He won.

Jack Dempsey was boxing’s superstar. The “Manassa Mauler” earned his nickname with crushing punches. That evening, Dempsey was fighting the towering Luis Ángel Firpo, “the Wild Bull of the Pampas,” the first Argentinian to ever contend for the world Heavyweight Championship.

Toward the close of the first round, Firpo managed to pin Dempsey against the ropes. With a combination of vicious punches, Firpo knocked Dempsey out of the ring. As Dempsey landed, he cracked the back of his head against a reporter’s typewriter and opened a serious gash.

The ringside reporters shoved Dempsey back into the ring in time to beat the count. As Dempsey got his legs under him, Firpo quickly pounced to deliver another barrage of punches. Still wobbly, Dempsey was just able to fend Firpo off when the bell sounded to end the round.

Dempsey had suffered the most dramatic knockdown of his career. Yet he came out of his corner furious to start the second round. In fifty-seven seconds, he knocked Firpo out with a blow to the jaw.

Sportswriter Allen Barra narrates what happened next: “And then, in a moment of almost heartbreaking pathos, the tiger of just seconds before turned into a lamb, stooping down to help up his bloody, beaten foe as the more than 80,000 in attendance at the Polo Grounds roared their approval.”

Before that night, Dempsey had been one of the sport’s least popular champions. More often than not, crowds cheered for him to be knocked out. But that changed when the crowd saw him pushed to the limit of his ability, humbled, and still triumphant. It was Dempsey who defeated Firpo — but it was Firpo who made Dempsey an unforgettable champion.

Dempsey became a legend not despite Firpo, but because of Firpo — just as Ali was great because of Frazier, Shakespeare was great because of Marlowe, and Raphael and Michelangelo pushed each other to new heights.

We don’t know what greatness we’re capable of until we’re tested.

There’s a simple way to think about applying this in your own life. Here’s a formula I recently shared with a group of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan, all of whom were making the transition to civilian life:

The magnitude of the challenge × your intensity = your rate of growth

It’s an idea, of course, not a mathematical formula.

But you do need big challenges in your life, and you need to bring intensity to those challenges if you aim to grow.

When I came home from Iraq and started working with veterans who felt stuck, I’d often ask, “What’s your challenge right now?”

I’d often ask them to think back on their military training. It was the hardest thing that most of them had done up to that point in their life, and almost all of them brought intensity to it. And then I asked them to remember how much they changed then, how much they grew.

When many veterans came home from war, they found that they were given many things: free tickets, gift baskets, blankets. What they needed, however, was a challenge. These were men and women of incredible ability, some of whom had done work overseas that was more difficult than anything their peers had ever done. And yet, home from war, people were no longer willing to challenge them, and, without a challenge, these veterans started to drift.

Recognize the paradox here. Life was — by almost any measure — easier at home. There are no bombs, no bullets flying. People had more material comforts. Their friends and their family were closer — and yet it was here, at home, that they were struggling.

When people feel stuck it’s often not because things are too hard, but because their goals are too small. Why work your heart out for a goal that’s small?

In that boxing match in 1923, Dempsey’s opponent was clear: Firpo. In most of our lives things aren’t as clear cut as in a boxing match; we may well be striving for a cause, for our family, for our team. But we can always ask ourselves, “What’s my challenge right now?”

Pick a big challenge. Maybe, even, pick the right and honorable fight — you’ll be stronger and better on the other side.

 

Why Every Man Should Be Strong.

Why Every Man Should Be Strong.

 

It can not be understated how important the role of strength was in ancient times, especially since it was the core of a universal code of manhood. Strength forms the nucleus on manliness, as it truly makes all other manly virtues possible.

Strength may not seem very important in today’s world where most men sit behind desks at work all day. But being strong is never a disadvantage. Strength forms the backbone of the code of manhood, and the ethos of Strength and Honor.

1. Building strength boosts your physical and mental health.

2. Physical strength is practical and prepares you for any emergency.

3. Building Physical strength teaches life lessons.

4. Strength acts as the backbone to our virtue.

5. Strength secures our virtue onto us.

6. Strength-building honors your ancestors.

7. Strength fells awesome.

 

Before modernity, a man had to be physically strong in order to survive and reproduce. Whether battling the elements or other men, our ancestors had to rely only on their cunning and physical strength to come off as the conqueror. The men who tried to prove themselves in battles or hunts, dared to do great things, and had the physical strength to surmount any obstacle were the ones who were able to father children and pass on their genes. The ones who did not take the gamble, or did not have the strength and prowess of their peers, died childless, and their hapless genes died with them.

What this means is that we are all descendants from the strongest, fastest, smartest, bravest men of the past-the world’s alpha males.

When we train to be physically strong, we show reverence and honor for the men who came before us that had to be physically strong so that we might exist and enjoy the comforts we have today.

Vires et honestas. Strength and honor.

7 Lessons from Socrates on Wisdon, Wealth, and the Good Life

 

deathofsocrates_large_large

What is the Good Life? What is the meaning of Strength and Honor to you?

 

 

What is the Good Life ?

Our character is molded by the choices we made each and everyday.  I’ve found that these 7 lessons from Socrates help me bridge the gap between the person I am and the person I strive to become.

 

1.  “Those who are already wise no longer love wisdom – whether they are gods or men. Similarly, those whose own ignorance has made them bad, rotten, evil, do not strive for wisdom either. For no evil or ignorant person ever strives for wisdom. What remains are those who suffer from ignorance, but still retain some sense and understanding. They are conscious of knowing what they don’t know.” Here, Socrates notes that many of us are aware of our intellectual limitations, even while we’re striving to acquire wisdom.

2. “Well I am certainly wiser than this man. It is only too likely that neither of us has any knowledge to boast of; but he thinks that he knows something which he does not know, whereas I am quite conscious of my ignorance. At any rate it seems that I am wiser than he is to this small extent, that I do not think that I know what I do not know.” Socrates is famous for knowing the limits of his knowledge.

3. “Oh my friend, why do you, who are a citizen of the great and mighty and wise city of Athens, care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor and reputation, and so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul, which you never regard or heed at all? Are you not ashamed of this?” This is a simple plea by Socrates for all us to have more balance in out lives.

4. “For I go about doing nothing else than urging you, young and old, not to care for your persons or your property more than for the perfection of your souls, or even so much; and I tell you that virtue does not come from money, but from virtue comes money and all other good things to man, both the individual and to the state.” I love this particular quote, though it’s not easy to decipher. He appears to be saying that all of us don’t spend enough time striving for moral perfection. If we did, then good things would result.

5. “Fellow citizens, why do you turn and scrape every stone to gather wealth, and, yet, take so little care of your own children, to whom one day you must relinquish all.” This quote is particularly helpful to those of us who are parents.

6. “In truth, the fear of death is nothing but thinking you’re wise when you are not, for you think you know what you don’t. For no one knows whether death happens to be the greatest of all goods for humanity, but people fear it because they’re completely convinced it is the greatest of evils. And isn’t this ignorance, after all, the most shameful kind: thinking you know what you don’t.”

7. “At the time, I made it clear once again, not by talk but by action, that I didn’t care at all about death – if I’m not being too blunt to say it – but it mattered everything that I do nothing unjust or impious, which matters very much to me. For though it had plenty of power, that government didn’t frighten me into doing anything that’s wrong.” 

 

We all need to stand for something in life, and sometimes we’ll need to pay a price for our beliefs. What price are you willing to pay?

Live with Strength and Honor.