Monthly Archives: August 2014

Why Every Man Should Be Strong.

Why Every Man Should Be Strong.

 

It can not be understated how important the role of strength was in ancient times, especially since it was the core of a universal code of manhood. Strength forms the nucleus on manliness, as it truly makes all other manly virtues possible.

Strength may not seem very important in today’s world where most men sit behind desks at work all day. But being strong is never a disadvantage. Strength forms the backbone of the code of manhood, and the ethos of Strength and Honor.

1. Building strength boosts your physical and mental health.

2. Physical strength is practical and prepares you for any emergency.

3. Building Physical strength teaches life lessons.

4. Strength acts as the backbone to our virtue.

5. Strength secures our virtue onto us.

6. Strength-building honors your ancestors.

7. Strength fells awesome.

 

Before modernity, a man had to be physically strong in order to survive and reproduce. Whether battling the elements or other men, our ancestors had to rely only on their cunning and physical strength to come off as the conqueror. The men who tried to prove themselves in battles or hunts, dared to do great things, and had the physical strength to surmount any obstacle were the ones who were able to father children and pass on their genes. The ones who did not take the gamble, or did not have the strength and prowess of their peers, died childless, and their hapless genes died with them.

What this means is that we are all descendants from the strongest, fastest, smartest, bravest men of the past-the world’s alpha males.

When we train to be physically strong, we show reverence and honor for the men who came before us that had to be physically strong so that we might exist and enjoy the comforts we have today.

Vires et honestas. Strength and honor.

7 Lessons from Socrates on Wisdon, Wealth, and the Good Life

 

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What is the Good Life? What is the meaning of Strength and Honor to you?

 

 

What is the Good Life ?

Our character is molded by the choices we made each and everyday.  I’ve found that these 7 lessons from Socrates help me bridge the gap between the person I am and the person I strive to become.

 

1.  “Those who are already wise no longer love wisdom – whether they are gods or men. Similarly, those whose own ignorance has made them bad, rotten, evil, do not strive for wisdom either. For no evil or ignorant person ever strives for wisdom. What remains are those who suffer from ignorance, but still retain some sense and understanding. They are conscious of knowing what they don’t know.” Here, Socrates notes that many of us are aware of our intellectual limitations, even while we’re striving to acquire wisdom.

2. “Well I am certainly wiser than this man. It is only too likely that neither of us has any knowledge to boast of; but he thinks that he knows something which he does not know, whereas I am quite conscious of my ignorance. At any rate it seems that I am wiser than he is to this small extent, that I do not think that I know what I do not know.” Socrates is famous for knowing the limits of his knowledge.

3. “Oh my friend, why do you, who are a citizen of the great and mighty and wise city of Athens, care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor and reputation, and so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul, which you never regard or heed at all? Are you not ashamed of this?” This is a simple plea by Socrates for all us to have more balance in out lives.

4. “For I go about doing nothing else than urging you, young and old, not to care for your persons or your property more than for the perfection of your souls, or even so much; and I tell you that virtue does not come from money, but from virtue comes money and all other good things to man, both the individual and to the state.” I love this particular quote, though it’s not easy to decipher. He appears to be saying that all of us don’t spend enough time striving for moral perfection. If we did, then good things would result.

5. “Fellow citizens, why do you turn and scrape every stone to gather wealth, and, yet, take so little care of your own children, to whom one day you must relinquish all.” This quote is particularly helpful to those of us who are parents.

6. “In truth, the fear of death is nothing but thinking you’re wise when you are not, for you think you know what you don’t. For no one knows whether death happens to be the greatest of all goods for humanity, but people fear it because they’re completely convinced it is the greatest of evils. And isn’t this ignorance, after all, the most shameful kind: thinking you know what you don’t.”

7. “At the time, I made it clear once again, not by talk but by action, that I didn’t care at all about death – if I’m not being too blunt to say it – but it mattered everything that I do nothing unjust or impious, which matters very much to me. For though it had plenty of power, that government didn’t frighten me into doing anything that’s wrong.” 

 

We all need to stand for something in life, and sometimes we’ll need to pay a price for our beliefs. What price are you willing to pay?

Live with Strength and Honor.